Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Mick Hugh

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The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

I write under the name Mick Hugh. It’s more a homophone than an actual psuedonym, but I’m stuck working straight-tie jobs for a living and need some anonymity. I already have a hard enough time explaining background-check anomalies.

In what part of the world do you live?  Tell us about it.

An hour west of New York City. From here, 30min west you’re in Appalachia, pitch-black forested hills at night, and 30min east you’re in the gray urban sprawl of howling Essex County. This is an interesting region; though boring, being so inbetween the extremes. Pick-up trucks picking up day-laborers and BMWs driving to corporate parks.

Please tell us about yourself.  

I started writing seriously in college. Spent a summer on an empty campus wandering around writing a novel, dropped out, moved to a different city with a friend, hitchhiked around, then was homeless, wandered back home, fell in love, moved to another city, worked odd-jobs, finished my degree (journalism); am raising a son, working full-time, and dragging my ass out of bed early AM to write in the dark morning’s quiet.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

MicksNeonFog.com

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?

Mick’s Neon Fog is my fourth or fifth blog. I had a journal-blog in college, then a blog about hitchhiking and “urban-camping”, then some other ones, then finally landed a form that fit well. And so stuck with it. They’re poems without stanzas, which might seem lazy, but they’re too cathartic to pay attention to line breaks. That’s my motivation – the blog’s a release valve.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

The dim hope of someday writing for a living. I can’t think of anything more freeing than not having to take orders from people, and being able to sit and think and write (and of course hitchhiking to book-signings). Though, the blog’s been half-full, on a good week. I started farming poems (actual, stanza’d poems) out to magazines, to see if they’ll turn a penny or an eye. That, and I started a novel again, finally.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

November of 2016. I thought Jasper was pulling my leg when he first emailed me.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?

A few weeks after starting Mick’s Neon Fog I got an email from Jasper. I thought he was full of shit. Someone wanted me as a contributor? I was floored. The whole SD community is an excellent thing to be part of. It’s the frontier of literature for the digital age. I joined because that excites the shit out of me.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?

Weirdos who scribble weird poems in weird little dark rooms, valuing messy, raw honesty over the picket-fence poetics that somehow garner national acclaim.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?

Metaphors. That’s the secret language of every artist. If we leave everything to definitions and boundaries, there’s no freedom. A good metaphor suggests something clear without defining it, sullying it. SD writers, like every good writer, want freedom from something, or everything. As to our specific SD secret language, there’s clearly a lot of overlap in what we’re each trying to break away from.

What are your literary influences?

I’ve a stupid breadth of literary interests. Top of the list for influences, Sylvia Plath and DF Wallace.

Has any of your work been published in print?  (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?

I came across Vagabonds: Anthology of the Mad Ones shortly after bumming around the country. So I wrote a prose-poem about friends taking turns driving with their eyes shut down the highway. That was my first published piece. Then, a short story in Digging Through the Fat (I think that was it), then just SD. I just sent out a crop of poems (yes, with actual stanzas), so hopefully I can add to the list, soon.

Do you have writing goals?  What are they?

I want to write for a living. I don’t want to take orders from people, and I don’t want to give people orders. I want a quiet farm house in PA close enough that I can bum around Philly as I please. And I’d like a Master’s in English. I think it’d be rad to be an English professor smelling of beer and tweed, scribbling madly in the mornings before yelling about Proust to a bunch of stunned Freshmen.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?  Please share a few links.

My favorites are the last 3 poems I’ve finished. I sent them out for money, and so haven’t published them elsewhere. The last few pieces are a big notch of improvement.

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

It’s write or die. It’s life on our own terms or it’s a slow death on our knees. Society determines success by how many people we stand on, and unless the few of us can blaze a road out of this human cluster-fuck, we’re all doomed. Writing is radical. The best writing is a great metaphor that bursts our boundaries. And that’s the only thing that’ll save anyone, bursting out of these dishonest boundaries. I feel like I should end with something hopeful, but I’m really not in the mood. Write on, SD!

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Basilike Pappa

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The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Under my own, which is actually Vassiliki. Its transliteration into English destroys it, so now it’s Basilike. Doesn’t sound exactly right, but looks better. Pronounced Ba-SEE-lee-kee, by the way.

In what part of the world do you live?  Tell us about it.

For the past five years I’ve been living in Trikala, in central Greece. Having moved here from Athens, I sometimes want to stab the quiet flow of life in the back; other times I feel there is nothing like sitting under the shadow of plane trees next to the river Letheus.

Most people here move by bicycle. I must be the only person in town who doesn’t know how to ride one.

If you were here and wanted to see Greece’s history in five buildings, I’d take you to the Asclepion and the Roman baths, the Byzantine fortress and the mosque of Osman Shah. For some bad, unimaginative late 20th century architecture, I could show you any building in the center.

Bad news: this is not a seaside town and the summers here are blazing.

Good news: the mountains are near if you like the forest. I do.

Please tell us about yourself.  

Some words and some people’s voices have flavors. This happens mostly in Greek. The word skopós, for example, tastes like wafer when it means ‘purpose,’ but has no taste at all when it means ‘guard.’

Katey Sagal’s voice is peanut butter. She makes me want to grab a jar and eat it to the end.

I love saving old furniture from the streets and giving them a second chance. My bedside table is such an abandoned piece. I’ve painted it black and orange – its former bedroom wouldn’t recognize it.

The historical time I find most intriguing is the Middle Ages. Even though I know that if I lived then, I wouldn’t stand a chance.

Don’t tell anyone, but I don’t like Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. Twice I tried to read it, twice I felt as if they sentenced me to twenty years of boredom.

I’d love to live forever in a Michel Cheval painting.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

My blog is Silent Hour

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?

I started my blog in 2017, after publishing some poems and stories on online magazines. I was happy that the editors liked my work, but I had no way of knowing how many people read it and what they thought of it. The blog gave me the chance to see if anyone cares about what I write.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

My inspiration comes from a book I read, a song I heard, a painting I saw; from a single line that comes to mind and waits there for its perfect match to turn up; and from personal experiences.

The writer friends I’ve made through my blog are also an inspiration. Their work is both a reading pleasure and a writing lesson.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

May 2018.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?

Sudden Denouement had captured my attention from the beginning of my blogging life. It featured some amazing talents. I got to know some of them better and write with them. When I was officially asked to join, I felt very honored.

What does Divergent Literature mean to you?

Divergent is the literature that cooks with idiosyncratic salt and unorthodox spice, to produce dishes of anomalous virtue. Not a big fan of conventional vegetables, it only serves them as amuse-bouches accompanied with bottles of quicksilver.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?

You know, when you are traveling by car with friends, and there is no need for music to be on, no one feels they should speak, and you can all enjoy the ride within a warm silence? That sounds like the secret language, I think.

What are your literary influences?

I wish I had the twisted imagination of Edgar Allan Poe, the dark humor of Fay Weldon, the surrealism of Achille Campanile, the cleverness of Daniel Handler, the skill of Zoe Heller, the wit of Oscar Wilde, the sensuality of M. Karagatsis.

Has any of your work been published in print?  (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?

I haven’t published anything myself. My poems Melinda’s Long Scarf Syndrome, Ulula and Marriage a la Mode are in the printed winter 2017 issue of Rat’s Ass Review.

Do you have writing goals?  What are they?

To go on writing. And  to complete a collection of fairytale and myth re-tellings.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?  Please share a few links.

How Demons Get their Wings

Melinda’s Long Scarf Syndrome

Helix

What else would you like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

 

I’m never going to author words that sound like music in a bag

or grammar stones wrapped in newsletters.

I’ll cover me in paper leaves, lull me gently, ink my wires

and either I’ll become a microcosm of re-imagined senses

or, I swear, I’ll turn into a perfectly tuned clock.

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Aurora Phoenix

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The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Aurora Phoenix

In what part of the world do you live? Tell us about it.
I live split between Dayton and Cincinnati, OH, USA. I enjoy the ease of access to nearly everything I need, while I find the viewpoints to be often a bit conservative. The most important defining characteristic of home to me is the location of my loved ones, so this is home.

Please tell us about yourself.
I am a professional career woman, mother and partner. I am in the process of rebuilding my life after an incarceration, and work multiple jobs as I regain my footing. I love to travel, including immersing myself in nature, experiencing new places, and photographing those experiences. There are never enough hours in the day to do all that I want and need to do. The most baffling thing that anyone can say to me is that they are bored. How is that possible in world so full of possibilities?

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.
https://auroraphoenixdoc.wordpress.com
When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?
My blog was begun for me, while I was incarcerated. I was writing daily, for the literal survival of my soul, and mailing my work home. Family members were encouraged to create a blog. After I returned home, I picked up the blog myself. It took me a while to begin interacting within the blogging community.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?
I have various motivations to continue blogging. One is the desire to continue to hone my writing, as I would eventually like to publish a book of my own work. I also greatly appreciate the community with which I have become connected on WordPress. At times, I am inspired to write by experiences in my daily life. At others, I am inspired by the work of other amazing writers and am prompted to write by their pieces.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?
I was invited to join one of Sudden Denouement’s sister sites in spring of 2017. I later joined with several other writers in creating Blood Into Ink, another affiliated site which highlights work related to trauma survival.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?
I had found Sudden Denouement as I began to interact among WordPress writers and was greatly impressed with their work. I submitted a piece to a writing contest and was astonished and thrilled to place within the top 10 pieces submitted. I remain immensely honored to be a part of such an incredibly talented group of writers.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
To me, Divergent literature means writing without being harnessed to rules, whether they be of genre, syntax or rhythm.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?
The challenge with any secret language is in the translation. While it may read differently for each of us, it is the gusted spray of our carotids upon the page.

What are your literary influences?
This is a tricky question, since I began college as an English major and ended that in disgust after a semester in which my professors forced interpretations of various works as all revolving around sex and death. (I became a psychology major and rehashed that argument with Freud.)
I would have to say, for sheer determination, Anne Frank.
Laura Ingalls Wilder, to whom I credit a lifelong love of reading.

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?
A had 4 pieces published in an Anthology last year, The Poetic Bond VII. I submitted in response to a call for submissions and had several pieces accepted.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?
While I would love to eventually have a book of my own work published, my greatest goal for my writing is that is speaks to people. I do hope that my writing also creates greater awareness regarding the injustices rife within the criminal justice system.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Another challenging question. Often when I write it has the quality of giving birth – it is laborious and intimate and intense – and when I am done, I don’t look back. Then sometimes when I do re-read old pieces, I am surprised 😊.
Dreaming
Cuts of Silence
Still
Trouble in the Keys

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

When I was a child, being a writer was one of my dreams. For many years, it went unrealized. I am ecstatic that I can now call myself a writer.

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Georgia Park

 

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Georgia Park

In what part of the world do you live?

I live in Salem, MA, USA. I lived in South Korea for several years and saved up enough money while I was there that I could have started a life anywhere. I considered moving to Germany or Chicago afterwards, but Salem is my Ithaca. It’s a small, touristy town on the ocean with a community of artists, which includes some of my greatest friends and worst enemies. I need the friends to inspire me and the enemies to keep my competitive edge.

It also has a lot of little pockets of nature for hiking, fantastic diners, is close to NYC, Boston, and Vermont, and not too far from Canada (just in case). Finally, there is a sufficient amount of Korean food to be had here. I love it.

Please tell us about yourself.
I am finishing a master’s in writing and will pursue an MFA or doctorate next. I am so proud to be a part of Sudden Denouement and Whisper and the Roar. With encouragement from the editors at both of these collectives, I have gone on to publish a book, Quit Your Job and Become a Poet (Out of Spite), and I continue keep up my poetry blog obsessively. I do fictional and non-fictional, funny, playful, dark, morbid, Trump related and non Trump related poems, with or without an emphasis on travel.
I work just over full time as a report editor and then edit some more for fun in between writing my thesis and reviewing books, so although I do have at least two books coming out, I’m not sure when I’ll find the time to write them. Hopefully soon.

Rave reviews:
“Park is a cabaret player for the page….Her poems are agile, improvisational, and pleasingly untidy.” -Zachary Bos, Pen and Anvil Press

“Georgia Park has a wonderful talent.” -Jasper Kerkau, Sudden Denouement

“Put on your seatbelts, because this poet has a tendency to take you places.”-Michelle La Poetica, Dencity

“Fresh, driven, surprising…” -J.D. Scrimgeour, Salem Writers

“…a natural voice. I feel the deep sense of loss, search, and emotion [in] ..the raw openness of your work.” -Jonathon Starke, Palooka

“[Georgia Park] carries complex emotion through swift, abrupt line breaks, creating a palpable and thoughtful sense of motion for the reader.” -Tethered by letters, F(r)iction

“…Shit.” -General murmur in the audience

“I will never eat spaghetti again.” -Unnamed slam poet

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.
Privatebadthoughts.com

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?
When I returned to America from South Korea, I suffered a bit of a nervous breakdown. I resurrected a blog I had when I was young after I had a falling out with the only person in town I knew, a local writer, who called me some very nasty names. I didn’t know anyone else and felt like I couldn’t join the local writing community after that, so I brought it to the web, where Jasper Kerkau (creator of Sudden Denouement) found me and left encouraging comments. I had a habit of deleting blogs and starting new ones under different names at the time, and Jasper always found me. It was his encouragement that first motivated me to continue on. He has been a huge support and inspiration, along with Christine Ray.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?
I’ve often said that my poetry is like piss, shit and vomit. It just keeps coming out. A more interesting question for me would be what inspires me to stop blogging on my site. Occasionally I get paranoid about who reads and privatize it or I’ll experience a lull. During the lulls in posting poetry on my blog, I am either reading or writing outside of poetry. Outside of poetry, I also write newspaper articles (not under my pseudonym) for the local paper, non-fiction, and fiction, which I tend not to post.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?
A few months after coming home from Korea, in November of 2016.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?
I eventually decided to research Jasper Kerkau, faithful commenter that he was, discovered Sudden Denouement, and asked to join. I felt completely alone before that. It really changed my life for the better in that I have found the courage to surrender to my dream and make writing my life, practical or not.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
Take a look at Sudden Denouement, and you’ll see it right away. The writers themselves are of all identities and walks of life, and their pieces are crafted with diverse techniques from wildly various subject matter.

I had a professor in college once assign us three poetry books, all by straight white males, all talking about their childhoods. With all the diversity that exists in the writing world, on all levels, I think that’s such a sin.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?
Fdsk mone oi e.

What are your literary influences?
David Sedaris, Jack Keroauc (poetry), Jim Behrle, Laura Mullen, Jasper Kerkau, Christine Ray

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?
Yes, in the Sudden Denouement anthology, the Offbeat literary journal (I submitted through submittable), and Pen and Anvil Press made a bite-sized chapbook for me as well as included me in a bite sized breakfast themed chapbook. Pen and Anvil press accepted me because I went to a writer’s group in Boston and cried about how much I hate the writers in Salem and needed to show at least one of them how much better I was. In fact, most of my literary achievements have been born of spite or vengeance. Sudden Denouement and Whisper and the Roar are the only two that were born of love.
Speaking of which, I will also be featured in one of Sudden Denouement editor Nicholas Gagnier’s forthcoming anthologies, All the Lonely People.

I’ve also had a book published and wrote a couple articles for the local newspaper, if that counts.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?
I want to get into a fully funded MFA when I’m finished with my master’s, mostly because it will buy me more time to write. If that doesn’t happen, I may do some part time work for full time money overseas (I’m thinking teach college in China or Saudi Arabia). I really need more time to write.

I want to publish a second poetry book with Sudden Denouement. I want to be asked to do more readings. My third book will be nonfiction essays, ala David Sedaris. I am working on both now.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Crumpled Up Biographies
Late
I Just Got Back

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?
The members of Sudden Denouement are not vicious or competitive, but completely supportive. This is a really special community that doesn’t exist in such a pure state elsewhere in the writing world. I am so proud to call the members of Sudden Denouement my friends. Together, we can take over the world.

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Kristiana Reed

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Kristiana Reed

In what part of the world do you live? Tell us about it.

I live in England, in Colchester, the oldest recorded town in Britain. Its Roman name was Camulodunum and is known for being razed to the ground by Queen Boudicca in AD60.

Please tell us about yourself.

I’m 24 and an English teacher. I teach kids aged 11 – 16 and when I’m not doing that I’m either reading, writing, people watching or cooing at my cat. Mostly, I’m cooing at my cat.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

I write at My Screaming Twenties.

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?

I began my blog towards the end of 2016 after a sleepless night, tossing and turning, kicking myself for not writing enough, for thinking the world is beautiful and painful and not sharing my feelings with anyone. I had dabbled previously with blogging and always failed to discipline myself enough. My Screaming Twenties, however, was born out of a need to share. It wasn’t anything I had felt before and so it began. The name is a play on the Roaring Twenties, except I’m kicking and screaming through mine as I find my voice, struggle and survive with depression at different junctures and fall in and out love with people, landscapes and songs.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

At first, it was the likes and the kind comments. Since joining Whisper and the Roar, Blood into Ink and Sudden Denouement and meeting people in person and online who inspire and support me, I write because I finally have the courage to call myself a writer. Writing has become less of a hobby and more a labour of love – a very therapeutic one.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

April 2018.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?

I was invited by the other collective members and of course, I said yes! I feel incredibly honoured and I am loving every second of being a part of such a warm, welcoming and phenomenally talented community.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?

Divergent Literature is the stuff I wish I taught in the classroom. It’s storytelling which isn’t bound by rules, meter and form; it’s literature which comes from our darkest and lightest places. It doesn’t ‘break rules’; it simply does not have them.

Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language.’ What is it?

As a reader and writer of Sudden Denouement material, the ‘secret language’ for me is the innate ability to speak from a personal experience yet still speak to the very core of many others.

What are your literary influences?

For when I’m angry or hopelessly in love – spoken word poetry. My favourites are Sarah Kay and Neil Hilborn (essentially most Button Poetry poets). When I’m feeling whimsical – story books. The ones I read when I was little, Fitzgerald, Waugh, Salinger, Fante, Haig and Ahern. When I’m feeling clever – the classics. Homer, Virgil and essays written by professors I’m loathe to let go of, despite graduating three years ago with my Classics degree. Then, as a teacher with a syllabus – I teach Shakespeare, Stevenson, Wilfred Owen, Tennyson, Dharker, Agard, Dickens, Doyle etc. An eclectic bunch.

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?

I’ve been published in Nicholas Gagnier’s Swear to Me and FVR: The Collection. It happened because he is wonderful and gave me (and continues to) opportunities I never imagined would come my way. He is a dear friend and I am eternally grateful.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?

To keep at it. To start approaching literary magazines. To publish something celebrating my 25th birthday next May – the halfway point for My Screaming Twenties?

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Vigil
A Meadow
The Better Man

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

Thank you; for your warmth, kindness and support. You’re all wonderful.