Sudden Denouement Publishing Releases Composition of a Woman By Christine E. Ray

Sudden Denouement Publishing is proud to announce the release of Christine E. Ray’s book Composition of a Woman.

“Poet Christine Ray’s first printed collection of poetry, Composition of a Woman (Sudden Denouement Press, 2018) is a striking, fearless foray into the psyche of womanhood, both highly relatable and intensely personal for female readers and achingly candid and fascinating for male.”
Candice Louisa Daquin, Pinch the Lock

Composition of a Woman is now available at Amazon.comAmazon CanadaAmazon Australia, Amazon Europe ( Amazon.co.ukAmazon.deAmazon.frAmazon.it, and Amazon.es,) as well as other major retailers.  Signed copies are available in the Sudden Denouement Etsy Store

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Introducing Indie Blu(e)

The writers and editors at Sudden Denouement are a productive group- some of them are actively involved in their local writer communities, many write and serve as editors for other literary collectives such as Whisper and the Roar and Blood Into Ink, and quite a few have self-published books or published with Sudden Denouement Publishing.  This spring, Sudden Denouement’s own Kindra Austin, Jimmi Campkin, and Christine Ray founded a new site, Indie Blu(e), as a vehicle to support self-published writers and small independent press published writers, as well as the readers who are passionate about independent writing.

The concept for Indie Blu(e) grew out of the seed of the idea that individually independent writers have reach through word of mouth and social media, but that this reach could grow significantly if they networked with other independent writers to shine a spotlight on their collected body of work. Indie Blu(e) offers a home for curated writers to promote their books, provide readers with honest, thoughtfully crafted book reviews, and the opportunity to learn more about the member writers. It strives to be a hub for the type of edgy, high-quality writing that the three founders love to read and want to share with a broader community of readers.

The editors of Sudden Denouement would like to introduce you today to this exciting new resource for indie writers and fans of indie books.  We think it is a site worth watching.

Nicole Lyons Reviews Rachel Finch’s A Sparrow Stirs its Wings

Every now and then, when the world seems to be rocked in chaos and people are screaming without listening – vile words and cries for help climbing on top of and over each other – a single voice stands out, and that voice is pure in its truth and stunning in its wisdom.

Rachel Finch, and her debut book, A Sparrow Stirs its Wings, is that voice right now. Turning her heartbreaking abuse into heart-wrenching prose, Finch writes her truth and gives her strength to every unnamed victim turned survivor.

A Sparrow Stirs its Wings’ is both a hard and a beautiful book to read, the wisdom and the pain contained in these pages demand to be heard and felt long after she puts it all to bed.

There is no voice quite as beautiful as the calm and cool voice of a survivor, an advocate, and a poet, and Rachel Finch is all of these things and so much more.

A Sparrow Stirs its Wings deserves a much-loved place on the bookshelves of survivors across the globe, literature lovers everywhere, and the therapists who are breaking out of the confines of antiquated methods to treat people with breathtaking art therapy.

A Sparrow Stirs its Wings is available at Amazon.com


Nicole Lyons is a force of nature disguised as a writer, a social activist, a voice for the downtrodden, and a powerful poet with a delicate touch. She is a best selling published author, poet, and also a consulting editor for Sudden Denouement.  You can read more of her writing at The Lithium Chronicles.

Faye K. Brown Reviews Rachel Finch’s A Sparrow Stirs its Wings

“Pieces of me lie scattered in his fingerprints, his voice an echo at the base of my throat and as he nears me, I cross my heart and hope to die.” (He Will Carry Me, As Long A I Will Carry Him)

Amidst the hardships flowing through her veins, Rachel Finch has found salvation from sexual abuse and trauma through her poetry. This piece is just one of the many heart- wrenching, soul-shattering poems in her debut poetry book “A Sparrow Stirs Its Wings”.  Rachel invites her readers to over 120 pieces of her heart & soul, and I can guarantee you will need a box of tissues by your side for this book.

Split into two sections (Part One: Broken Egg Shells/ Part Two: Flight); readers can clearly identify the mood on the pages. Described within her poetic words are hellish moments worded so beautifully that you can’t help but to fight back the urge to dive in between the lines and save the girl before danger strikes. Rachel’s writing is spiritual, delicate, truthful, and at times, heart-piercing. There is a cleansing spirit even within the darker portions of the book:

“He thinks the darkness will swallow me whole, but he has forgotten that light burns within me.” (Inner Flame)

The emotions felt are powerful, and paralyzing.  Her words are a comforting hand to hold while they take you back to your own tragedies, as she holds you tight through poetry, and comforts you through her ability to be triumphant within turmoil.  A mark of a great poet Is the ability to make emotional connection with their audience, and Rachel Finch does exactly that.

Abuse is one of the most difficult subjects to write about, talk about, and acknowledge personally, let alone publicly.  Rachel has a way of bringing abrupt attention to the matter without glorifying it. This subject is trip-wired with fine lines, and she brilliantly dances right over them with a healing warrior goddess mentality and message:

“I spent so long in the dark that the moment the light streamed in, I let it swallow me whole. The beauty was everywhere, is, everywhere. People are so breath-taking. When they let themselves feel, when they choose to house truth on their tongue, when they grow from the pain.” (Growth from Part Two: Flight)

So often we feel ostracized and ashamed because of the terrible things other humans have inflicted upon us.  Rachel preaches to us to “Shed The Shame” because we are survivors, not victims; we can learn and grow from the pain, not let it destroy us; we have a choice to harness our power and use it for good, not continue the cycle.

Rachel reminds us that no one can take who we are away from us. We are warriors and she is holding up the eternal flame of righteousness, proudly displaying her battle scars – not for glory – but to share her bravery and reminding us that we are not defined by our tragedies, pain, and suffering. I don’t know about you, but I couldn’t ask for a better soul to lead me into battle.

There is no stone left unturned in “A Sparrow Stirs Its Wings”. This is our anthem for 2018. The revolution we have all been waiting for.

Rachel has gained success as an online poet and community leader via Facebook and Instagram on her “Bruised But Not Broken” page, as well as on her poetry page “Rachel”.  She has over 600,000 followers and counting. She is a unstoppable force that takes the time to comfort hurting and lost souls that need direction, healing light, a safe community, and family.  “A Sparrow Stirs Its Wings” is a tangible piece of her online legacy, as well as one of the most powerful collections of poetic literature I have had the honor and privilege to read.  Get ready for your world to be poetically ROCKED!

A Sparrow Stirs its Wings is available from Amazon.com

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Faye Brown is the author of Beautifully Damaged Things. You can read more of her writing at Black Orchid Poetry and FKBrown Poetry.

 

 

Mariah Voutilainen Reviews Anthology Volume I: Writings from the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective

Sudden Denouement’s Anthology Volume I: Writings from the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective demonstrates divergence in a multitude of ways

In late 2017, not long after I had started my own poetry blog on Word Press, I came across an intriguing site.  Its black and white vintage photos and classic layout invited me in.  The poems I read on that particular day were uniquely honest, full of rich free verse and wonderfully chosen words, so I chanced a look at the submissions requirements.  Right at the top of the page, in neon lights: “Hell- -here” it greeted potentials; the “o” and “T” fizzled out.  I chuckled with anticipatory glee, for under the classic front, something mischievous and dark lay there.  And as I read more of the collective’s poetry and prose, I did indeed feel the pull of Sudden Denouement’s careful attention to what it calls “divergent literature,” although I had yet to clarify with certainty what that meant.

In SD’s Anthology Volume I:  Writings from the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective, I found the answer.  In fact, this book served as a literary map leading me through landscapes of the human experience not found in other poetry and prose that I had read elsewhere.  This is due in part to the curators’ attention to diversity of experience and culture.  I marveled at the harmony of voices, each speaking truth from its corner of the world.  Each writer here has a part that blends in with the others, yet each piece has a distinct melody, a siren song that demands attention.  Trust me when I say that this is an odyssey not for the faint of heart; there is no gentle introduction to that world.

On the contrary, the book opens strongly, challenging readers to question their own views about what beauty and meaning in literature should be, what being a writer is.  The founder of the Sudden Denouement Collective, Jasper Kerkau, exclaims his writer identity is “anointed by almighty forces…to stand in the shadows and pay the price for all the beauty and unhappiness in the world.” (“I am a F*cking Writer!”) “These words have no meaning, when they sit on your screen,” writes Matthew D. Eayre in his poem “Subjective”.  In “On Becoming a Writer,” Christine E. Ray bemoans the possible isolation and invisibility: “…she felt like she was calling out her truths/into an empty desert landscape.”  Erich James Michaels likens the origin story of the poet to purposeful self-mutilation and self-removal from mainstream society (“Genesis”).  All of these are fighting words in a battle to speak truths that may not be acceptable to the mainstream but are vitally human.  To write in this divergent community is to steel oneself against a societal imperative to be vanilla in a land of a multitude of hidden and strangely delicious flavors.

There is no safety net in this world, either, and it is exhilarating.  The first two-thirds of the anthology jump from birds pecking at veins and skin (Ra’ahe Khayat’s “birds & h e a r t s”) to the regret of a missed life (Mick Hugh’s “Dream catcher never understood the bus schedule”) to the irony of a world in which everyone is forced to achieve the American dream (David Lohrey’s “Glass Ceiling”).  There are dark and desperate things, too, experiences thrown like blood and sometimes entrails onto the pages.  Henna Sjöblom’s “Miscarriage” is hard to forget for its painful description of the loss of an unwanted baby “I thought I could make something beautiful/out of my shame”.  Georgia Park’s “Weekly Meetings” made me uncomfortable, an invisible voyeur at a very charged gathering of Overeaters Anonymous.  “Feel up my female…I quite like the emptiness settled in the pit of me” Kindra M. Austin taunts in “Because I’m A Whore Who Asked For It,” as she succinctly details disgusting things that are done to women under that blanket excuse. These three pieces are not the only ones that reminded me of the aspects of human existence about which we are usually discouraged from asking lest we appear too curious, too unaware, too privileged.

Throughout, form and function, captivating lyricism and masterful usage of poetic devices abound.  But these are not tricks:  The stunning repository of words used and construction of phrases seamlessly blended.  I was repeatedly awed by the stories told, wishing for nothing more than continued passage into the world laid bare within the pages.  And yes, I would be remiss if I did not mention that multiple forays are required if only to immerse oneself in the minds of S. K. Nicholas and Jimmi Campkin, both of whom write prose that manages to be both shockingly sordid and beautifully compelling.  To chuckle at the humor that partners discontent in Oldepunk’s poetry.  To breathe in the headiness of Aakriti Kuntal’s lush and captivating similes.  There are gems on each page that cannot be missed, and sometimes I found them as I let words wash over me without specifically searching for meaning.

By the time I began reading the final third of the Anthology, I wished for respite from the unearthing of discontent and the unforgiving barrage of reality, even as it was sometimes cloaked in fantastical imagery.  And a partial reprieve came in the form of odes to the seasons: “The Marigold of months has sure begun./Fling back the shutters and let down your Hair…” (Lois Linkens’ “the Yellow month”) and Spring has “a vessel/for the softest fragrance” (Iulia Halatz’s “Song of Spring”).  There are testaments to romance and even epic love like Eayre’s “Out of My Hands,” but little if any frivolous romanticism here, just reality painted in elegantly brash words and unique imagery.  Finally and fittingly, remembrances of death serve as the beginning of the end of the Anthology.  In those poems and prose, I saw the openness of heart and strength of spirit required to allow total strangers to see the pain of losing a loved one.

Sudden Denouement’s Anthology exposes and breaks many of the taboos of being truly and unashamedly human, giving us permission to look at and embrace them in the moment of reading. I was allowed a glimpse into the writers’ souls; comprehending their words was an exercise in the development of understanding human nature.  This is a world in which the heaviness of life weights everything down until it is distilled—frustration and hate, love and unfiltered sex, bodily urges, addictions, the complexity of human interactions.  Descriptions are brightly painful in some cases, transparently critical in others, but always smack of truth.  Divergent work demands that there are no holds barred; the writer reveals everything, and cuts close to the bone, even his or her own, in order to create a pulsating, living amalgamation of words.

Anthology Volume I:  Writings from the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective is available through on Amazon.com and Amazon.com.uk.

 

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Just Released! Anthology Volume I: Writings from the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective

The Sudden Denoument Literary Collective is thrilled to announce the release of Anthology Volume I: Writings for the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective!  This long-awaited anthology is a thoughtfully curated compendium of the best writing published online by the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective from its launch in August of 2016 through April 2018. It includes 138 pieces of cutting-edge poetry, prose and short fiction written by 29 diverse writers from England, Romania, Japan, India, Finland, the United States and Canada. Thirty-one of the 138 pieces were written exclusively for the Anthology. This volume captures the astonishing raw power of these individual and united poetic voices.

Now available on Amazon.com and Amazon.com.uk

Coming July 2018- ‘A Sparrow Stirs its Wings’ by Rachel Finch

Sudden Denouement Publishing is thrilled to announce the upcoming release of Rachel Finch’s book of poetry ‘A Sparrow Stirs its Wings.” Rachel is the powerhouse behind the Bruised But Not Broken community on Facebook, which provides support and healing for trauma survivors. She is also a Contributing Writer for Blood Into Ink and founder of Bruised But Not Broken on WordPress. She is a symbol of hope throughout the world and we are honored to see her vision come to life.