Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Georgia Park

 

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Georgia Park

In what part of the world do you live?

I live in Salem, MA, USA. I lived in South Korea for several years and saved up enough money while I was there that I could have started a life anywhere. I considered moving to Germany or Chicago afterwards, but Salem is my Ithaca. It’s a small, touristy town on the ocean with a community of artists, which includes some of my greatest friends and worst enemies. I need the friends to inspire me and the enemies to keep my competitive edge.

It also has a lot of little pockets of nature for hiking, fantastic diners, is close to NYC, Boston, and Vermont, and not too far from Canada (just in case). Finally, there is a sufficient amount of Korean food to be had here. I love it.

Please tell us about yourself.
I am finishing a master’s in writing and will pursue an MFA or doctorate next. I am so proud to be a part of Sudden Denouement and Whisper and the Roar. With encouragement from the editors at both of these collectives, I have gone on to publish a book, Quit Your Job and Become a Poet (Out of Spite), and I continue keep up my poetry blog obsessively. I do fictional and non-fictional, funny, playful, dark, morbid, Trump related and non Trump related poems, with or without an emphasis on travel.
I work just over full time as a report editor and then edit some more for fun in between writing my thesis and reviewing books, so although I do have at least two books coming out, I’m not sure when I’ll find the time to write them. Hopefully soon.

Rave reviews:
“Park is a cabaret player for the page….Her poems are agile, improvisational, and pleasingly untidy.” -Zachary Bos, Pen and Anvil Press

“Georgia Park has a wonderful talent.” -Jasper Kerkau, Sudden Denouement

“Put on your seatbelts, because this poet has a tendency to take you places.”-Michelle La Poetica, Dencity

“Fresh, driven, surprising…” -J.D. Scrimgeour, Salem Writers

“…a natural voice. I feel the deep sense of loss, search, and emotion [in] ..the raw openness of your work.” -Jonathon Starke, Palooka

“[Georgia Park] carries complex emotion through swift, abrupt line breaks, creating a palpable and thoughtful sense of motion for the reader.” -Tethered by letters, F(r)iction

“…Shit.” -General murmur in the audience

“I will never eat spaghetti again.” -Unnamed slam poet

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.
Privatebadthoughts.com

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?
When I returned to America from South Korea, I suffered a bit of a nervous breakdown. I resurrected a blog I had when I was young after I had a falling out with the only person in town I knew, a local writer, who called me some very nasty names. I didn’t know anyone else and felt like I couldn’t join the local writing community after that, so I brought it to the web, where Jasper Kerkau (creator of Sudden Denouement) found me and left encouraging comments. I had a habit of deleting blogs and starting new ones under different names at the time, and Jasper always found me. It was his encouragement that first motivated me to continue on. He has been a huge support and inspiration, along with Christine Ray.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?
I’ve often said that my poetry is like piss, shit and vomit. It just keeps coming out. A more interesting question for me would be what inspires me to stop blogging on my site. Occasionally I get paranoid about who reads and privatize it or I’ll experience a lull. During the lulls in posting poetry on my blog, I am either reading or writing outside of poetry. Outside of poetry, I also write newspaper articles (not under my pseudonym) for the local paper, non-fiction, and fiction, which I tend not to post.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?
A few months after coming home from Korea, in November of 2016.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?
I eventually decided to research Jasper Kerkau, faithful commenter that he was, discovered Sudden Denouement, and asked to join. I felt completely alone before that. It really changed my life for the better in that I have found the courage to surrender to my dream and make writing my life, practical or not.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
Take a look at Sudden Denouement, and you’ll see it right away. The writers themselves are of all identities and walks of life, and their pieces are crafted with diverse techniques from wildly various subject matter.

I had a professor in college once assign us three poetry books, all by straight white males, all talking about their childhoods. With all the diversity that exists in the writing world, on all levels, I think that’s such a sin.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?
Fdsk mone oi e.

What are your literary influences?
David Sedaris, Jack Keroauc (poetry), Jim Behrle, Laura Mullen, Jasper Kerkau, Christine Ray

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?
Yes, in the Sudden Denouement anthology, the Offbeat literary journal (I submitted through submittable), and Pen and Anvil Press made a bite-sized chapbook for me as well as included me in a bite sized breakfast themed chapbook. Pen and Anvil press accepted me because I went to a writer’s group in Boston and cried about how much I hate the writers in Salem and needed to show at least one of them how much better I was. In fact, most of my literary achievements have been born of spite or vengeance. Sudden Denouement and Whisper and the Roar are the only two that were born of love.
Speaking of which, I will also be featured in one of Sudden Denouement editor Nicholas Gagnier’s forthcoming anthologies, All the Lonely People.

I’ve also had a book published and wrote a couple articles for the local newspaper, if that counts.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?
I want to get into a fully funded MFA when I’m finished with my master’s, mostly because it will buy me more time to write. If that doesn’t happen, I may do some part time work for full time money overseas (I’m thinking teach college in China or Saudi Arabia). I really need more time to write.

I want to publish a second poetry book with Sudden Denouement. I want to be asked to do more readings. My third book will be nonfiction essays, ala David Sedaris. I am working on both now.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Crumpled Up Biographies
Late
I Just Got Back

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?
The members of Sudden Denouement are not vicious or competitive, but completely supportive. This is a really special community that doesn’t exist in such a pure state elsewhere in the writing world. I am so proud to call the members of Sudden Denouement my friends. Together, we can take over the world.

spaces tightly recede – samantha lucero

i’m unhurt here; deeply wrapped inside this ill-starred cell.

chaste of catching time in its seeping hoards
that worm, or unpolluted by the
lightless nature of breath in my
anemic boat

i can oar inside this fervid pulse where
i’m electrically prolonged
inside that silky wave
the wistful
scene i’ll dream
and dream again

where life unearths
or perhaps, i wince and the spaces
tightly recede

and though i sink into an oily red
womb of her fastenings
i won’t dream of an appalling life
when i hiccup or pirouette my shaping
limbs to arrive at this
eternal return

of what

none outside this narrow pool
can dream or know, i’ll dream;

put me back into that blood
that last drowsy warmth
of my eyes yawned shut
before the first scream.

to sleep and sleep and finally sleep!

 

 


Samantha Lucero writes at sixredseeds.

The Waiting Room/Caterina Gentile

It is a heated chamber
Off of medication
I dream of a gaping vortex in the sky
A whole in the universe and spinning
somethings.
The awkward silence between you and I
Laughter from behind a shut door
We are all the same
A schizo? Nervous? Lonely?
Abused. Abandoned. Depressed.
I wonder what your day consists of
Or what you have to go home to
-or what you don’t-
Or where you came from.
In session, we do not disturb.
Out of session is a different story.

C.Gentile is a poet currently in the process of obtaining her master’s degree in English Literary Studies at Salem State University. She is a self-proclaimed Star Wars nerd, novelty sock enthusiast and passionate lover of Canada Dry ginger-ale products. In her spare time she enjoys watching movies listening to 90’s alternative music and spending time with close friends and family.

Breaking for Birds/Caterina Gentile

headlights

 

The drive
Cleared the cobwebs
And for a while the darkness
Crept back into the corner it’s stored in.

It’s a never-ending cycle when you keep
Count of the times
I broke for a bird
And I took it in.
The second, the moment, the breath.

I wondered the life it held
The story it holds
The fear it felt.
Does it wonder the same?

Does it know I keep burning bridges
And digging myself into deeper places I
Don’t want to be in?

Does it know it can fly away when it wants
Instead of lock eyes with me
Staring at me
Wondering if I’ll hit it
Even if I stopped?

C. Gentile is a poet currently in the process of obtaining her master’s degree in English Literary Studies at Salem State University. She is a self-proclaimed Star Wars nerd, novelty sock enthusiast and passionate lover of Canada Dry ginger-ale products. In her spare time she enjoys watching movies listening to 90’s alternative music and spending time with close friends and family.

She would the small Swift be-Lois E. Linkens

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It was a late night when the notion came;

Black and atrous in the dry car park.

Night was cruel – weekend smelled like beer and dark,

A mouth-organ’s growl ran as nuns in shame

Behind her heel, music and love like red

Syrup oozed through her white gold flesh. ‘Kind sweet

Abandon – here I sink my thirsting teeth

Into thy bitter lemon starlight, said

To tell us  – close and fragrant – of our gloom.

My word – how I am stuck in this life’s cement!’

She wants to watch the Osprey, awful claws and

Black-tipped wings abeat to topple Doom,

The horrible slicing of silver flesh —

Puccoon drops t’wards foamy throes, Death’s velvet

Smalt does seduce the coy in brilliance

She curiously craves. Still, as the Osprey fight,

She would the small Swift be; ‘Oh tireless Swift,

Who sleeps in flight, thy burnet body quick

Like wind. No time to think or grieve, no rights

To charmed senses to hapless misconceive.’


[ Lois is a poet and student from England. She is studying the literature of the Romantics and hopes their values and innovations will filter through into her own work. She is working on longer projects at present, with a hope to publish poetry collections and novels in the years to come. She is a feminist, an nostalgic optimist, and a quiet voice in the shadows of Joanne Baillie and Charlotte Smith. It is a pleasure to present her work, and you can find more of it at Lois E. Linkens.]

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Jonathan O’Farrell

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The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?
Jonathan O’Farrell, but also to be somewhat developed and further adopted ‘ misterkaki ‘

In what part of the world do you live? Tell us about it.
I currently own a house near Leicester in the Midlands of England. But to be honest I have not actually stayed here more than a couple of months since November 2016.
It is a rather unlovely ex coal mining village, albeit it is surrounded by England’s biggest and longest term land regeneration project, The National Forest.

Please tell us about yourself.

Semi-nomad at the moment and in the moment, Creative life transitioner, blogger, photographer, tentative shamanic student and, apparently, poet.
Forthcoming, my first two photographically illustrated anthologies, 2018; ‘Trinity’ and ‘Seasoned in Time’. 2019; ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors, Fire!’.
As rich as the creative experience the current life is, exploring Portugal, France, Spain and later Ireland, by winter 2018 I hope to have ‘settled’, a ‘tiny house” or similar, with sufficient land. The vision; create an abundant garden, for lost souls, separated loved ones, under the sun. A meeting place, with coffee, inspiring books, poetry and healing, however it may arise.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

Misterkaki.wordpress.com

misterkaki-writer.substack.com

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?
I began on WordPress around the spring of 2017. When I started WordPress it was more for somewhere for me to record short ‘thought pieces’, a few travel tips and to some extent a minor showcase for my photography. Since then I have posted much more poetic content, as this has burgeoned. Substack is a new venture, taking over from my presence on Patreon. It will I hope be a platform for a monthly newsletter that can be subscribed to.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?
Of itself it is enough essentially to be a living archive of my writing and visual creativity. Of course the regular and supportive presence of a subscribing and most importantly, commenting readership is a big factor too.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?
As I recall July 2017.
Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?
I sent in a poem or two. I subsequently had a number of very enthusiastic online conversations and emails with Jasper Kerkau.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
In an overstimulated and seemingly homogenous world literature and other multimedia expression that authentically and without compromise cuts through this perceived predominancy.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?
I perceive this as a brotherhood / sisterhood, even a cabal of writers that, even given our inherent divergence, essentially ‘get’ what the ‘otherness’ is saying.

What are your literary influences?
Ian Dury, soul / punk / funk wordsmith and songwriter. Chap had severe disabilities, but yet a big inspiration. More conventionally, in literary terms the German poet Rainer Maria Rilke is, I have to say, a fair influence in the genre of poems I might call ‘love letters in transit’. Also figuring W.B. Yeats, Rumi, Khali Gibran and our very own S.K. Nicholas. But to be honest, you are as likely to see me reading books on celtic shamanism at the moment. Let’s just say my influences are eclectic, divergent even!

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?
Published in: Harbinger Asylum: Winter 2017 Paperback – 22 Dec 2017 ISBN-13: 978-1981623723

I wrote to Dustin and submitted three poems and two were published.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?
Forthcoming, my first two photographically illustrated anthologies, 2018; ‘Trinity’ and ‘Seasoned in Time’. 2019; ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors, Fire!’.
More collaborative writing. Thus far I have done some poetry with Canadian author Mary Rodgers. They are in the process of being submitted to Enrealment Press.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Lucid Learning Moments

The Well of Presence

Ritual

and finally, because simply I am fascinated by time and try to live in a present, created afresh in the moment, this, my very latest and curiously, longest by far, poem:

those days

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

A bit of a reveal; as rich as the creative experience the current life is, exploring Portugal, France, Spain and later Ireland, by winter 2018 I hope to have ‘settled’, a ‘tiny house” or similar, with sufficient land. The vision; create an abundant garden, for lost souls, separated loved ones, under the sun. A meeting place, with coffee, inspiring books, poetry and healing, however it may arise.

You see, whilst my writing is my doing; my doing is my writing.

Finally, I must say how very encouraged I am by the latest SD developments, not only that, but by those who had the vision to initiate this divergent literary revolution in the first place. You have my gratitude.

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Kristiana Reed

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Kristiana Reed

In what part of the world do you live? Tell us about it.

I live in England, in Colchester, the oldest recorded town in Britain. Its Roman name was Camulodunum and is known for being razed to the ground by Queen Boudicca in AD60.

Please tell us about yourself.

I’m 24 and an English teacher. I teach kids aged 11 – 16 and when I’m not doing that I’m either reading, writing, people watching or cooing at my cat. Mostly, I’m cooing at my cat.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

I write at My Screaming Twenties.

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?

I began my blog towards the end of 2016 after a sleepless night, tossing and turning, kicking myself for not writing enough, for thinking the world is beautiful and painful and not sharing my feelings with anyone. I had dabbled previously with blogging and always failed to discipline myself enough. My Screaming Twenties, however, was born out of a need to share. It wasn’t anything I had felt before and so it began. The name is a play on the Roaring Twenties, except I’m kicking and screaming through mine as I find my voice, struggle and survive with depression at different junctures and fall in and out love with people, landscapes and songs.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

At first, it was the likes and the kind comments. Since joining Whisper and the Roar, Blood into Ink and Sudden Denouement and meeting people in person and online who inspire and support me, I write because I finally have the courage to call myself a writer. Writing has become less of a hobby and more a labour of love – a very therapeutic one.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

April 2018.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?

I was invited by the other collective members and of course, I said yes! I feel incredibly honoured and I am loving every second of being a part of such a warm, welcoming and phenomenally talented community.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?

Divergent Literature is the stuff I wish I taught in the classroom. It’s storytelling which isn’t bound by rules, meter and form; it’s literature which comes from our darkest and lightest places. It doesn’t ‘break rules’; it simply does not have them.

Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language.’ What is it?

As a reader and writer of Sudden Denouement material, the ‘secret language’ for me is the innate ability to speak from a personal experience yet still speak to the very core of many others.

What are your literary influences?

For when I’m angry or hopelessly in love – spoken word poetry. My favourites are Sarah Kay and Neil Hilborn (essentially most Button Poetry poets). When I’m feeling whimsical – story books. The ones I read when I was little, Fitzgerald, Waugh, Salinger, Fante, Haig and Ahern. When I’m feeling clever – the classics. Homer, Virgil and essays written by professors I’m loathe to let go of, despite graduating three years ago with my Classics degree. Then, as a teacher with a syllabus – I teach Shakespeare, Stevenson, Wilfred Owen, Tennyson, Dharker, Agard, Dickens, Doyle etc. An eclectic bunch.

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?

I’ve been published in Nicholas Gagnier’s Swear to Me and FVR: The Collection. It happened because he is wonderful and gave me (and continues to) opportunities I never imagined would come my way. He is a dear friend and I am eternally grateful.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?

To keep at it. To start approaching literary magazines. To publish something celebrating my 25th birthday next May – the halfway point for My Screaming Twenties?

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Vigil
A Meadow
The Better Man

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

Thank you; for your warmth, kindness and support. You’re all wonderful.