Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Jonathan O’Farrell

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The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?
Jonathan O’Farrell, but also to be somewhat developed and further adopted ‘ misterkaki ‘

In what part of the world do you live? Tell us about it.
I currently own a house near Leicester in the Midlands of England. But to be honest I have not actually stayed here more than a couple of months since November 2016.
It is a rather unlovely ex coal mining village, albeit it is surrounded by England’s biggest and longest term land regeneration project, The National Forest.

Please tell us about yourself.

Semi-nomad at the moment and in the moment, Creative life transitioner, blogger, photographer, tentative shamanic student and, apparently, poet.
Forthcoming, my first two photographically illustrated anthologies, 2018; ‘Trinity’ and ‘Seasoned in Time’. 2019; ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors, Fire!’.
As rich as the creative experience the current life is, exploring Portugal, France, Spain and later Ireland, by winter 2018 I hope to have ‘settled’, a ‘tiny house” or similar, with sufficient land. The vision; create an abundant garden, for lost souls, separated loved ones, under the sun. A meeting place, with coffee, inspiring books, poetry and healing, however it may arise.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

Misterkaki.wordpress.com

misterkaki-writer.substack.com

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?
I began on WordPress around the spring of 2017. When I started WordPress it was more for somewhere for me to record short ‘thought pieces’, a few travel tips and to some extent a minor showcase for my photography. Since then I have posted much more poetic content, as this has burgeoned. Substack is a new venture, taking over from my presence on Patreon. It will I hope be a platform for a monthly newsletter that can be subscribed to.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?
Of itself it is enough essentially to be a living archive of my writing and visual creativity. Of course the regular and supportive presence of a subscribing and most importantly, commenting readership is a big factor too.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?
As I recall July 2017.
Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?
I sent in a poem or two. I subsequently had a number of very enthusiastic online conversations and emails with Jasper Kerkau.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
In an overstimulated and seemingly homogenous world literature and other multimedia expression that authentically and without compromise cuts through this perceived predominancy.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?
I perceive this as a brotherhood / sisterhood, even a cabal of writers that, even given our inherent divergence, essentially ‘get’ what the ‘otherness’ is saying.

What are your literary influences?
Ian Dury, soul / punk / funk wordsmith and songwriter. Chap had severe disabilities, but yet a big inspiration. More conventionally, in literary terms the German poet Rainer Maria Rilke is, I have to say, a fair influence in the genre of poems I might call ‘love letters in transit’. Also figuring W.B. Yeats, Rumi, Khali Gibran and our very own S.K. Nicholas. But to be honest, you are as likely to see me reading books on celtic shamanism at the moment. Let’s just say my influences are eclectic, divergent even!

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?
Published in: Harbinger Asylum: Winter 2017 Paperback – 22 Dec 2017 ISBN-13: 978-1981623723

I wrote to Dustin and submitted three poems and two were published.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?
Forthcoming, my first two photographically illustrated anthologies, 2018; ‘Trinity’ and ‘Seasoned in Time’. 2019; ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors, Fire!’.
More collaborative writing. Thus far I have done some poetry with Canadian author Mary Rodgers. They are in the process of being submitted to Enrealment Press.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Lucid Learning Moments

The Well of Presence

Ritual

and finally, because simply I am fascinated by time and try to live in a present, created afresh in the moment, this, my very latest and curiously, longest by far, poem:

those days

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

A bit of a reveal; as rich as the creative experience the current life is, exploring Portugal, France, Spain and later Ireland, by winter 2018 I hope to have ‘settled’, a ‘tiny house” or similar, with sufficient land. The vision; create an abundant garden, for lost souls, separated loved ones, under the sun. A meeting place, with coffee, inspiring books, poetry and healing, however it may arise.

You see, whilst my writing is my doing; my doing is my writing.

Finally, I must say how very encouraged I am by the latest SD developments, not only that, but by those who had the vision to initiate this divergent literary revolution in the first place. You have my gratitude.

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Sarah Doughty

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

My name is Sarah Doughty and it is not a pseudonym. I wanted my real attached to my words, not just because it’s nice to see my name, but also as a means of showing I’m fully capable as a writer – which is something I was told I would never be able to do as a child. I very much wanted to prove that theory wrong. And I believe I have succeeded in that endeavor.

In what part of the world do you live?  

I live in Indiana USA, in a suburb just outside Indianapolis. It’s an interesting place to live, I’ll leave it at that.

Tell us about yourself. 

Writing has always been a passion of mine. Even as a child I dreamed up stories to tell and even used crayons to attempt to tell those stories. But my childhood wasn’t one of light and happiness. It was dark, cold, and full of horrors most people wouldn’t dream of. Not only was I a victim of abuse, I was a victim of daily abuse. In every way imaginable. For my entire childhood. In addition to all the physical things that happened to me, I was reminded on a daily basis how worthless I was to my abuser. How little I mattered, except for getting what he wanted out of me. I was told that any dreams I might have – like growing up, finding love, happiness, and being successful at anything, including writing – would never come to pass, because I simply wasn’t good enough to do those things. My entire childhood was marred by these daily occurrences. So much, that I suffer from complex PTSD, debilitating anxiety, and depression. It’s a battle I fight every day.

Where do you publish your writing?

My website is called Heartstring Eulogies – a place where I can share my soul in words. It can be found at www.sarahdoughty.com. I can also be found at @thesarahdoughty on Instagram at www.instagram.com/thesarahdoughty.

When did you begin your blog and what motivated you start it?

A little over three years ago, I hit a wall. I was slowly remembering the worst of my abuse. The things that happened late at night after the world was asleep. The things that took place after I was beaten. At first I thought I was having some rather disturbing visions, dreams, and thoughts, but then I realized they were flashbacks. My worst fears were real. I wasn’t beaten unconscious when I was a child. My mind repressed the memories of being sexually abused. When I hit that wall, I found myself in a job that I loved, but crumbling under the pressure. I needed to do something for myself. I needed to finally turn to writing, one of the few things I can do that actually makes me feel better. Helps me to center myself and to calm down. I wanted a means of keeping myself accountable for my goals. Not only did I want to prove my abuser wrong – to prove to myself that I was capable of writing, and maybe, if I was lucky, find others that enjoyed reading my words as well. So I began to write. Every day. Even on holidays. I was writing. And it helped me feel better. It became a habit, a need. And I flourished doing it. It made me genuinely happy. I have been writing ever since. I accomplished my goal, and I have no intention of stopping.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

Initially I wanted my website/Instagram to be a part of my daily accountability – to force myself to keep posting, to keep writing. But along the way, I found much more than that. I’ve met some incredible souls along this journey that I wouldn’t trade for anything. They are my sisters, my brothers, my support system. The ones I can turn to when I need some encouraging words. What I found was a family – a virtual one, but still very near and dear to my heart. They are what keep me going. Not just through their continued support, but for their love of what I share. And the souls I’ve touched – the readers I’ve been so fortunate to find – they are a daily reminder that I do have a gift and that I should continue sharing it.

 When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

I joined Sudden Denouement about a year ago. It’s strange to think that I’ve been a part of this amazing group for so long. It’s been a pleasure and an honor to have my name included with some amazing writers.

How did you find your way to Sudden Denouement?

I suppose it was a lucky twist of fate. At least I’d like to think so. I met some incredible writers, and as Sudden Denouement began to make a name for itself, it was like a piece of a puzzle that fit just right. When I expressed my interest to join, I was honored to have been accepted into the fold.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?

I believe that writing should push boundaries. That it should hit deep into memories, emotions, and tackle tricky situations and global topics. When I see “Divergent Literature,” this is exactly what comes to mind. Every piece I have read that has crossed Sudden Denouement’s doors, has hit on something important – but not in the same fashion as most other collectives. Writers at Sudden Denouement dare to go deeper. They dare to do more. And that’s what I love about it.

Sudden Denouement Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?

I think for many of us, this “secret language” is what we make of it. It’s how we share our souls with the world. How we can see, even between the lines, into the core of what these writers are saying. How we can relate on such a deep level and come out the other side feeling like we’ve met someone that knows exactly how we feel, or have felt in the past. I think we are all fluent in this secret language, and it brings us closer together.

Tell us about your literary influences?

Growing up, when I wasn’t writing, I was reading. Anything to escape my life and become someone else. I’ve always been drawn to the darker side of tales. The horrors, the paranormal. As long as the characters are worth believing in, or are worth caring about, it doesn’t matter to me how fantastical the story is. I want to see how they come out the other side. In a way, that makes the characters more real to me. That’s why I’ve always loved Poe and Dante Alighieri, and those dark epic poetries. That’s why I’ve always been fascinated with Stephen King. That’s also why I decided to never shy away from the dark or even the fantastical – as long as the characters are real and flawed – the story is worth telling and reading.

Has any of your work been published in print?  How did that happen?

I’ve been published in many different publications through the years. School and university publications, online publications. Even a few anthologies and special collaborations that are now in print. I’ve always been humbled and honored when editors read my words and feel that they should be shared with their readers.

My books are like my babies. I wrote the stories because they nagged at the back of my head for years. They needed to be told. And I love my characters. I’m rooting for them all the way. I’ve laughed with them, cried with them, lived with them. Telling their stories has been incredibly fun – and incredibly healing at the same time. That was why I made the decision to self-publish them for free. As long as my stories help me to feel better about my dark past and my current issues, I don’t want cost to prevent someone from being able to read them.

What are your writing goals?  

This last year has been especially hard on me, because I have migraines. They’ve been so severe that my books have been put on hold. I want to continue, and finish that initial story – wherever it leads me. It’s amazing how one scene in a dream has spawned an entire series of books – one big story. Beyond that, I want to continue writing the same kinds of stories that resonate with me – not just the stories, but the characters. So many more stories to tell, and I want to be able to tell them all.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?  

I have so many favorites, it’s difficult to choose. These are a few that I hope you will enjoy as much as I do.

Stillness

Travels

The Essence of Regret

Set on Fire

 What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

No matter where my story takes me, I am honored to be able to write these words and share them with the world. I am honored to have a voice when I had none growing up. I am honored to be alive, when there were so many times I could have died. I am honored to be among friends, writers, and family. I am so very honored to be a part of Sudden Denouement and to have this family on this journey with me. I hope that the future holds only good things for all of us.

 

 

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Matthew Eayre

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Matthew D Eayre

In what part of the world do you live?  

Houston, Texas. It rains a lot and there’s a lot of bad drivers.

Tell us about yourself. 

I’m a chronically depressed masochistic asshole and I use writing to relieve internal pressure. I’m married with children and we’re mostly happy. I’ve just turned 40 in January and the last week of April through the first week of May is my least favorite time of year.

Where do you publish your writing?

Uneven Street Studios

When did you begin your blog and what motivated you start it?

At the beginning of 2016, I needed a place to post longer writes. Social media is really only good for short pieces.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

Whenever I start writing and the word count goes over 500 I blog it. Everything in life holds some inspiration, some piece of poetry. I see it and write it out as well as I can.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

Near the end of 2017.

How did you find your way to Sudden Denouement?

I’m friends with Nicole Lyons and she vouched for me.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?

Any type of literature that defies classification.

Sudden Denouement Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?

If I tell you, it won’t be a secret.

Tell us about your literary influences?

Everything from Shakespeare to Stephen King, I grew up with the classics and I had a voracious literary appetite for the first 35 years of my life. I’ve read over 10,000 books and I enjoy learning new things. I like to think I’ve taken a bit from each of the writers I’ve read over the years.

Has any of your work been published in print?  How did that happen?

I’ve self-published a book, Reaching for the Light. A short collection of some various writings. I’ve had a few pieces published in anthologies and one in a nonfiction book about invisible illness. I’m currently working on my next book, although that means I’m mostly procrastinating the editing process.

What are your writing goals?  

I want to write the perfect poem. Until such time as I do that, I’ll keep trying.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?  

Poetry of Monsters/June 22, 2016

The Road Ahead

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What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

Life is hard.

    Love harder.

 

 

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Kindra M. Austin

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Kindra M. Austin. Previously, I wrote under Pammy Pamtastico! I think of Pammy often. She was a real Class F lady. I feel her sometimes, trying to peel back the skin on my fingertips.

In what part of the world do you live?  

I live in the village of Chesaning, a fading tourist town in mid-Michigan, situated on the Shiawassee River. Chesaning was formally known as Showboat City, and fuck tons of people from all over would visit during the weeklong Showboat Festival held in July. Or August. I can’t remember. After 76 years, the Showboat Festival met its demise in 2013, and the Shiawassee River Queen was retired. Probably made into firewood. It’s a bummer. Showboat was pretty cool. I saw Weird Al perform at the park, and he was excellent.   

I despise winter, but Michigan is stunning in the summer and fall, especially the Upper Peninsula. I recommend visiting the Mackinac Bridge; Tahquamenon Falls State Park; Painted Rocks in Alger County; and Canyon Falls on the Sturgeon River. The Up-North landscape truly does sing to the soul—it’s a place you can sit utterly alone, and feel full. What a stunning sensation, inhaling the breath of nature so rich. But, my absolute favorite Michigan destination is Lake Huron, specifically Tawas City, located on the east coast of the Lower Peninsula. Because sentimental reasons.

Tell us about yourself. 

My favorite color is green, all hues, excluding neon. Is neon considered a hue?

Soy sauce makes me so ill that just the sight of it causes nausea. When I go to a Chinese restaurant, I have to cover the Kikkoman bottle with a napkin. Funny, as a toddler, my mother always caught me drinking soy sauce like it was soda. I also ate butter.

I love animals. I feed stray cats, and build them box houses. I can’t bring any animals inside because my cat would fuck their shit right up. Melvin is not charitable. I wonder where I went wrong with him.

My top five favorite music artists will always be The Beatles; Pink Floyd; Led Zeppelin; Bob Dylan; and Fleetwood Mac.  

If a Dawson’s Creek marathon is on television, goddamn it, I’m going to stop whatever it is I’m doing, and waste my whole day watching this horseshit.  

I’m often misjudged as an extrovert. Don’t get me wrong, I know how to have a good fucking time. I’m a loud talker who laughs often, but what I love most is discussing philosophies, and life experiences. I really dig people who are into ploughing deep, and I’m happy to stay awake until stupid ‘o clock in the morning with the right person. Unfortunately, I’m a cold lover. I require ridiculous stretches of seclusion following any type of social affair—unless I spat you from my womb, don’t bother phoning me before a minimum of 120 hours have expired.

Where do you publish your writing?

Poems & Paragraphs 

When did you begin your blog and what motivated you start it?

I began Poems & Paragraphs in April, 2016, after a seven year hiatus from blogging. I’d made some people dangerously angry, so I stepped out for a nap. When I woke up, I said, “Fuck this. I’m done hiding.” I started a new blog under my own name that very day.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

My emotions. I have to write them out. I have to know that I am not alone. And I have to let others know that they are not alone. Human connection, it’s a beautiful thing.

I don’t often sit at my computer and write about rainbows. No, I’d rather tap out the shit that follows rainbows. Not that I’m perpetually miserable. I’m actually naturally cheerful. I just feel that my calling is to write about trauma, and to expose the darkness that exists alongside my happiness.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

My debut Sudden Denouement piece, The Archer and the Scorpion, was published on July 24, 2017.

How did you find your way to Sudden Denouement?

I was a follower of SD early on, and I entered the March Madness contest in 2017; I submitted a piece called, A Moment of Dying, and made the top ten. I was freaking celebrating. For realz, what a boost to my self-esteem on the heels of returning from a long hiatus! When I was formally invited to join Sudden Denouement, I accepted, knowing this was a place that would help me grow as a writer, and human being. The writers who make up the collective are a bunch of elite bananas.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?

Divergent Literature is Punk Rock truth—unfettered and brazen. Divergent Literature screams “Individual.” Fuck the mainstream rules.   

Sudden Denouement Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?

I don’t know that the ‘secret language’ can be defined. For me, it’s like trying to delimit a feeling. Maybe that’s the answer—the ‘secret language’ is as simple and as complicated as a feeling. You know it when you know it, you know? Does that even make sense? Or did I just take a politician’s way out of answering this question?

Ugh. Sometimes I’m the worst.

Tell us about your literary influences?

  1. Sylvia Plath. She’s the realest, most gorgeous of confessional poets. Plath wrote her absolute truths, ugly as they were, and her employment of language is a marvel. The Bell Jar is my favorite literary novel. “To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is a bad dream.” 
  2. John Steinbeck. His modest and straightforward style cannot be copied. To me, Steinbeck is a king of unpretention, among the sincerest of voices in literary history.
  3. Charles Bukowski. Duh.
  4. Edgar Allan Poe. My favorite short story of his is William Wilson. The attack is subtle, which makes the conclusion fucking brilliant. William Wilson is a character I relate to—my Pammy Pamtastico!
  5. Ray Bradbury. Hello! Anyone who says they don’t like Bradbury can take a long walk off a short pier.
  6. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger. I’ve read Salinger’s other works, but that man-child, Holden Caulfield, is one my very favorite literary characters. “It’s funny. All you have to do is say something nobody understands and they’ll do practically anything you want them to.”

Has any of your work been published in print?  How did that happen?

In April, 2017, I self-published my debut novel, Magpie in August. My book of poems and prose, Constant Muses, followed in December. Both are available at Amazon.

I began writing Magpie as a form of therapy—a fictionalized diary inspired by my relationship with my mother. I spent nearly two years shaping the narrative, and editing. Upon completion, I began sending queries to agents. Though I did gain some interest, nothing panned out with the big guys, so I decided to self-publish. I admit my patience is lacking; however, I don’t regret my decision. Magpie was published on my own terms, with cover art designed by the artist of my choice, Allane Sinclair.

My mother died unexpectedly in October, 2017, so I decided to dedicate my untitled poetry and prose project to her, and add content regarding the initial impact of her death. I came up with the title Constant Muses, and again, I trusted Allane to design the cover. Allane is a brilliant artist, who turned a tarnished photograph of my mother into a stunning tribute. I released Constant Muses on December 5, 2017.

What are your writing goals?  

I’m presently working on another book of poems and prose—a year of my life minus my mother. I’m also finishing up a novella, which will be available by mid-summer, if all goes according to my plan.

Also, I want to be a rap lyric composer. But not like, gangsta. Like Eminem; he’s a brilliant poet.  

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?  

  1. Being the Way You Are: a brief memoir for my daughter, written April 16, 2016;
  2. Affliction, published on Sudden Denouement on October 25, 2017;
  3. Siren, published on Blood Into Ink on August 1, 2017;
  4. The Color of Beach Sand, published on Sudden Denouement on January 17, 2018;

 What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

What I’d like to add here is a bit of advice and encouragement to the blooming writer.

  1. Don’t sell yourself to trends that are uncomfortable, and buck propriety whenever it suits you.
  2. But be bold. Do challenge yourself to try new styles if you find yourself dissatisfied. You’ll find your strongest voice.
  3. Please, don’t be driven by accolades alone. You’ll only lose touch with yourself. Don’t be a phony.  
  4. Respect the craft, and have patience with yourself.
  5. Find a writing community and build genuine relationships.
  6. Remember that writing is an art form, and poetry is often subject to individual interpretation.
  7. Read a lot. A good writer is a person who reads.

I’m sending you all good vibes.  🙂