Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Georgia Park

 

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Georgia Park

In what part of the world do you live?

I live in Salem, MA, USA. I lived in South Korea for several years and saved up enough money while I was there that I could have started a life anywhere. I considered moving to Germany or Chicago afterwards, but Salem is my Ithaca. It’s a small, touristy town on the ocean with a community of artists, which includes some of my greatest friends and worst enemies. I need the friends to inspire me and the enemies to keep my competitive edge.

It also has a lot of little pockets of nature for hiking, fantastic diners, is close to NYC, Boston, and Vermont, and not too far from Canada (just in case). Finally, there is a sufficient amount of Korean food to be had here. I love it.

Please tell us about yourself.
I am finishing a master’s in writing and will pursue an MFA or doctorate next. I am so proud to be a part of Sudden Denouement and Whisper and the Roar. With encouragement from the editors at both of these collectives, I have gone on to publish a book, Quit Your Job and Become a Poet (Out of Spite), and I continue keep up my poetry blog obsessively. I do fictional and non-fictional, funny, playful, dark, morbid, Trump related and non Trump related poems, with or without an emphasis on travel.
I work just over full time as a report editor and then edit some more for fun in between writing my thesis and reviewing books, so although I do have at least two books coming out, I’m not sure when I’ll find the time to write them. Hopefully soon.

Rave reviews:
“Park is a cabaret player for the page….Her poems are agile, improvisational, and pleasingly untidy.” -Zachary Bos, Pen and Anvil Press

“Georgia Park has a wonderful talent.” -Jasper Kerkau, Sudden Denouement

“Put on your seatbelts, because this poet has a tendency to take you places.”-Michelle La Poetica, Dencity

“Fresh, driven, surprising…” -J.D. Scrimgeour, Salem Writers

“…a natural voice. I feel the deep sense of loss, search, and emotion [in] ..the raw openness of your work.” -Jonathon Starke, Palooka

“[Georgia Park] carries complex emotion through swift, abrupt line breaks, creating a palpable and thoughtful sense of motion for the reader.” -Tethered by letters, F(r)iction

“…Shit.” -General murmur in the audience

“I will never eat spaghetti again.” -Unnamed slam poet

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.
Privatebadthoughts.com

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?
When I returned to America from South Korea, I suffered a bit of a nervous breakdown. I resurrected a blog I had when I was young after I had a falling out with the only person in town I knew, a local writer, who called me some very nasty names. I didn’t know anyone else and felt like I couldn’t join the local writing community after that, so I brought it to the web, where Jasper Kerkau (creator of Sudden Denouement) found me and left encouraging comments. I had a habit of deleting blogs and starting new ones under different names at the time, and Jasper always found me. It was his encouragement that first motivated me to continue on. He has been a huge support and inspiration, along with Christine Ray.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?
I’ve often said that my poetry is like piss, shit and vomit. It just keeps coming out. A more interesting question for me would be what inspires me to stop blogging on my site. Occasionally I get paranoid about who reads and privatize it or I’ll experience a lull. During the lulls in posting poetry on my blog, I am either reading or writing outside of poetry. Outside of poetry, I also write newspaper articles (not under my pseudonym) for the local paper, non-fiction, and fiction, which I tend not to post.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?
A few months after coming home from Korea, in November of 2016.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?
I eventually decided to research Jasper Kerkau, faithful commenter that he was, discovered Sudden Denouement, and asked to join. I felt completely alone before that. It really changed my life for the better in that I have found the courage to surrender to my dream and make writing my life, practical or not.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
Take a look at Sudden Denouement, and you’ll see it right away. The writers themselves are of all identities and walks of life, and their pieces are crafted with diverse techniques from wildly various subject matter.

I had a professor in college once assign us three poetry books, all by straight white males, all talking about their childhoods. With all the diversity that exists in the writing world, on all levels, I think that’s such a sin.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?
Fdsk mone oi e.

What are your literary influences?
David Sedaris, Jack Keroauc (poetry), Jim Behrle, Laura Mullen, Jasper Kerkau, Christine Ray

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?
Yes, in the Sudden Denouement anthology, the Offbeat literary journal (I submitted through submittable), and Pen and Anvil Press made a bite-sized chapbook for me as well as included me in a bite sized breakfast themed chapbook. Pen and Anvil press accepted me because I went to a writer’s group in Boston and cried about how much I hate the writers in Salem and needed to show at least one of them how much better I was. In fact, most of my literary achievements have been born of spite or vengeance. Sudden Denouement and Whisper and the Roar are the only two that were born of love.
Speaking of which, I will also be featured in one of Sudden Denouement editor Nicholas Gagnier’s forthcoming anthologies, All the Lonely People.

I’ve also had a book published and wrote a couple articles for the local newspaper, if that counts.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?
I want to get into a fully funded MFA when I’m finished with my master’s, mostly because it will buy me more time to write. If that doesn’t happen, I may do some part time work for full time money overseas (I’m thinking teach college in China or Saudi Arabia). I really need more time to write.

I want to publish a second poetry book with Sudden Denouement. I want to be asked to do more readings. My third book will be nonfiction essays, ala David Sedaris. I am working on both now.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Crumpled Up Biographies
Late
I Just Got Back

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?
The members of Sudden Denouement are not vicious or competitive, but completely supportive. This is a really special community that doesn’t exist in such a pure state elsewhere in the writing world. I am so proud to call the members of Sudden Denouement my friends. Together, we can take over the world.

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Jonathan O’Farrell

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The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?
Jonathan O’Farrell, but also to be somewhat developed and further adopted ‘ misterkaki ‘

In what part of the world do you live? Tell us about it.
I currently own a house near Leicester in the Midlands of England. But to be honest I have not actually stayed here more than a couple of months since November 2016.
It is a rather unlovely ex coal mining village, albeit it is surrounded by England’s biggest and longest term land regeneration project, The National Forest.

Please tell us about yourself.

Semi-nomad at the moment and in the moment, Creative life transitioner, blogger, photographer, tentative shamanic student and, apparently, poet.
Forthcoming, my first two photographically illustrated anthologies, 2018; ‘Trinity’ and ‘Seasoned in Time’. 2019; ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors, Fire!’.
As rich as the creative experience the current life is, exploring Portugal, France, Spain and later Ireland, by winter 2018 I hope to have ‘settled’, a ‘tiny house” or similar, with sufficient land. The vision; create an abundant garden, for lost souls, separated loved ones, under the sun. A meeting place, with coffee, inspiring books, poetry and healing, however it may arise.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

Misterkaki.wordpress.com

misterkaki-writer.substack.com

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?
I began on WordPress around the spring of 2017. When I started WordPress it was more for somewhere for me to record short ‘thought pieces’, a few travel tips and to some extent a minor showcase for my photography. Since then I have posted much more poetic content, as this has burgeoned. Substack is a new venture, taking over from my presence on Patreon. It will I hope be a platform for a monthly newsletter that can be subscribed to.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?
Of itself it is enough essentially to be a living archive of my writing and visual creativity. Of course the regular and supportive presence of a subscribing and most importantly, commenting readership is a big factor too.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?
As I recall July 2017.
Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?
I sent in a poem or two. I subsequently had a number of very enthusiastic online conversations and emails with Jasper Kerkau.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
In an overstimulated and seemingly homogenous world literature and other multimedia expression that authentically and without compromise cuts through this perceived predominancy.

SD Founder Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language’. What is it?
I perceive this as a brotherhood / sisterhood, even a cabal of writers that, even given our inherent divergence, essentially ‘get’ what the ‘otherness’ is saying.

What are your literary influences?
Ian Dury, soul / punk / funk wordsmith and songwriter. Chap had severe disabilities, but yet a big inspiration. More conventionally, in literary terms the German poet Rainer Maria Rilke is, I have to say, a fair influence in the genre of poems I might call ‘love letters in transit’. Also figuring W.B. Yeats, Rumi, Khali Gibran and our very own S.K. Nicholas. But to be honest, you are as likely to see me reading books on celtic shamanism at the moment. Let’s just say my influences are eclectic, divergent even!

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?
Published in: Harbinger Asylum: Winter 2017 Paperback – 22 Dec 2017 ISBN-13: 978-1981623723

I wrote to Dustin and submitted three poems and two were published.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?
Forthcoming, my first two photographically illustrated anthologies, 2018; ‘Trinity’ and ‘Seasoned in Time’. 2019; ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors, Fire!’.
More collaborative writing. Thus far I have done some poetry with Canadian author Mary Rodgers. They are in the process of being submitted to Enrealment Press.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Lucid Learning Moments

The Well of Presence

Ritual

and finally, because simply I am fascinated by time and try to live in a present, created afresh in the moment, this, my very latest and curiously, longest by far, poem:

those days

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

A bit of a reveal; as rich as the creative experience the current life is, exploring Portugal, France, Spain and later Ireland, by winter 2018 I hope to have ‘settled’, a ‘tiny house” or similar, with sufficient land. The vision; create an abundant garden, for lost souls, separated loved ones, under the sun. A meeting place, with coffee, inspiring books, poetry and healing, however it may arise.

You see, whilst my writing is my doing; my doing is my writing.

Finally, I must say how very encouraged I am by the latest SD developments, not only that, but by those who had the vision to initiate this divergent literary revolution in the first place. You have my gratitude.

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Kristiana Reed

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?

Kristiana Reed

In what part of the world do you live? Tell us about it.

I live in England, in Colchester, the oldest recorded town in Britain. Its Roman name was Camulodunum and is known for being razed to the ground by Queen Boudicca in AD60.

Please tell us about yourself.

I’m 24 and an English teacher. I teach kids aged 11 – 16 and when I’m not doing that I’m either reading, writing, people watching or cooing at my cat. Mostly, I’m cooing at my cat.

If you have a blog or website, please provide the name and the link.

I write at My Screaming Twenties.

When did you begin your blog/website, and what motivated you start it?

I began my blog towards the end of 2016 after a sleepless night, tossing and turning, kicking myself for not writing enough, for thinking the world is beautiful and painful and not sharing my feelings with anyone. I had dabbled previously with blogging and always failed to discipline myself enough. My Screaming Twenties, however, was born out of a need to share. It wasn’t anything I had felt before and so it began. The name is a play on the Roaring Twenties, except I’m kicking and screaming through mine as I find my voice, struggle and survive with depression at different junctures and fall in and out love with people, landscapes and songs.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging on your site?

At first, it was the likes and the kind comments. Since joining Whisper and the Roar, Blood into Ink and Sudden Denouement and meeting people in person and online who inspire and support me, I write because I finally have the courage to call myself a writer. Writing has become less of a hobby and more a labour of love – a very therapeutic one.

When did you join the Sudden Denouement Literary Collective?

April 2018.

Why/how did you join Sudden Denouement?

I was invited by the other collective members and of course, I said yes! I feel incredibly honoured and I am loving every second of being a part of such a warm, welcoming and phenomenally talented community.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?

Divergent Literature is the stuff I wish I taught in the classroom. It’s storytelling which isn’t bound by rules, meter and form; it’s literature which comes from our darkest and lightest places. It doesn’t ‘break rules’; it simply does not have them.

Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language.’ What is it?

As a reader and writer of Sudden Denouement material, the ‘secret language’ for me is the innate ability to speak from a personal experience yet still speak to the very core of many others.

What are your literary influences?

For when I’m angry or hopelessly in love – spoken word poetry. My favourites are Sarah Kay and Neil Hilborn (essentially most Button Poetry poets). When I’m feeling whimsical – story books. The ones I read when I was little, Fitzgerald, Waugh, Salinger, Fante, Haig and Ahern. When I’m feeling clever – the classics. Homer, Virgil and essays written by professors I’m loathe to let go of, despite graduating three years ago with my Classics degree. Then, as a teacher with a syllabus – I teach Shakespeare, Stevenson, Wilfred Owen, Tennyson, Dharker, Agard, Dickens, Doyle etc. An eclectic bunch.

Has any of your work been published in print? (books, literary magazines, etc.) How did that happen?

I’ve been published in Nicholas Gagnier’s Swear to Me and FVR: The Collection. It happened because he is wonderful and gave me (and continues to) opportunities I never imagined would come my way. He is a dear friend and I am eternally grateful.

Do you have writing goals? What are they?

To keep at it. To start approaching literary magazines. To publish something celebrating my 25th birthday next May – the halfway point for My Screaming Twenties?

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites? Please share a few links.
Vigil
A Meadow
The Better Man

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?

Thank you; for your warmth, kindness and support. You’re all wonderful.

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Anthony Gorman

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.
What name do you write under?
I write under the name “Grumpy” Gorman. When I was in my teens, I wanted to write dark-tinged children’s poems under that pseudonym in homage to Mother Goose. Writing took a back-seat following a severely challenging mental health episode, and when I re-courted the craft, it was almost in reverse – I was writing tarred adult poems, with the familiar skip and ring of a kiddy write
In what part of the world do you live?
I live in Ottawa, Canada – a scenic city with a rich mix of cultures, but still quite conservative and stoic as a whole
Tell us about yourself.
I grew up in a loving, well-intentioned home that was inhabited with the beast that is mental illness. It kind of dictated the pace and direction of the family dynamic, often resulting in the throb and unpredictability of mood and behaviour. I followed by dropping high school altogether due to schoolyard violence and bullying. Later, I re-connected with post-secondary education in a Social Work capacity and spent approximately fifteen years in and out of crisis work and working with individuals living with concurrent disorders. My lived experience provided me the credibility and compassion needed to engage the ‘perceived’ unable to engage “resilients” in a helpful manner. Much of my writing is my own processing of vicarious and lived experience trauma. Some compositions are autobiographical, yet many involve my inhabiting the perspective of someone I’ve had the honour of working alongside. It’s messy, but cathartic. I am a divorced father to two wonderful children who bring ceaseless smiles in the limited time I see them. I currently work part-time as an Educational Assistant in the local school board, primarily with children with alleged and diagnosed behavioural challenges. The students know me as Mr. Gorman, “Grumpy” swapped in place of, of course. I am passionate about word manipulation, visual art, music and all things sensual. I feel deep and dig deeper.
Where do you publish your work?
Hands In the Garden – Short Poems for Short Attention Spans
When did you begin your blog and what motivated you start it?
A kindred friend introduced me to her WordPress blog about 5 years ago. We embarked on a short-lived collaborative project that involved discussion and examination of our senses and descriptions of their encounters with different world stimuli. I eventually started my own poetry and art site based on my suggested but rejected name for a band with my school-aged friends.
What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging?
As an individual who has limited social connections in my everyday life beyond the superficial and work-related, I have been able to connect with others who understand the value of the imaginative and oft affected spirit. I continue to blog because it keeps my mind creatively engaged and helps purge the clutter of the creaking brain.
How did you find your way to Sudden Denouement?
Shamefully, I was ignorant to Sudden Denouement’s existence before having connected unknowingly with one of it’s writers and editors. I had seen the name in passing and had always valued the poetry that had accompanied the name, but was that it was a collective that was so appreciative of diversity of strength/breath and nature of the beautiful, and harsh debris scattered throughout. It helps, even if modestly, a rather ghastly wound in our general societal acceptance and acknowledgement of the impacts of experienced and vicarious traumas.
What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
I would liken my visual interpretation of divergent to that of a several-headed serpent attempting to strike in seven directions at once. That, or a muddled mind being prodded by different emotions simultaneously, often grating at each other or in complementary friction of one another. Difference, outside the norm thinking, writing free of the guilt, shame and judgment. Raw expression, met with compassion, ideally.
Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language.’ What is it?
The secret language, simply put, is the complex, cathartic and tragic feelings, emotions, experiences externalized in tangibles, cradled in the empathy of the understanding. Kind of like getting out the gross, and having others identify and appreciate the messiness of the purge.
Tell us about your literary influences.
I am not particularly well-read and haven’t been exposed to an extremely diverse or obscure breadth of literature but I have always enjoyed the writing of Shel, Silverstein, Roald Dahl, Dr. Seuss and other imaginative bat-crap bizarre stuff. In fact, I enjoy a children’s novels for their limitless abilities to unhinge the expected and do so with saucer-eyed innocence. I swim in the biting snark of Oscar Wilde, and appreciate widely-lauded poetry of Plath, Hemmingway, Dickinson, Eliot. That being said, there are many modern poets I have discovered accidentally online who’ve had huge influence on my writing including the compositions of Robert Okaji, Braeden Michaels, Lou Rasmus, Jeanne of Borderline Crossing, Nan Mykel, Mark Tulin, Ankit Thapa, Erroneouschoices, Rory Mattier, several of the authors featured on this site and many other fairly unknown and unappreciated writers that I have shamefully yet unintentionally unmentioned here.
Has any of your work been published in print? How did that happen?
I have had poetry featured on The Vita Brevis, The Alien Poetry site
What are your writing goals?
My goals are to keep writing, developing, learning, clawing deeper and potentially delving into children’s novels and a gratuitous and silly autobiography that might take shape in the form of a silly graphic novel as per the suggestion of a fellow online writer.
Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?
Blunt Force
Refuge
Lupid
4:58
What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?
I want to share that my illness and experiences are rich in shame, but ripe in recovery and fight and that I feel extremely grateful to have landed myself among such a fine group of talented individuals. I’ve found my people.

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Nicole Lyons

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?
Nicole Lyons

In what part of the world do you live?
Beautiful British Columbia, Canada. I live where one must dress for all four seasons in one day.

Tell us about yourself.
I have the heart of an angel and the mouth of a drunken sailor. I am loyal to a fault and I always bet on the underdog. I dislike crowds and most people in general, and if it wasn’t for fear of depriving my daughters, I’d move us to a cabin in the woods near a secluded little lake to live out the rest of my days.

Where do you publish your work?
The Lithium Chronicles

When did you begin your blog and what motivated you start it?
A few years ago now, I can’t recall exactly when. I had been writing for some online magazines and mental health websites and decided to start my own and name it after my FB page I had started years before. I had finally accepted my diagnosis of bipolar disorder after many years of denial and I started to chronicle my journey on and off of meds and the bumpy road to stability. Sometimes I still wonder if I’ll ever reach that place.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging?
My head is a terrible, and sometimes a wonderful, place to be stuck in and I find writing not only helps me escape but also helps a few people who like to read my work.

How did you find your way to Sudden Denouement?
I stumbled onto the site and read Jasper and Sam and was blown away and had an overwhelming urge to submit, so I did.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
It’s fearless, it’s raw, and it’s honest. It’s nothing like everything you’ve always been told to read, and it’s everything any writers worth their salt will strive to nail down and pen for themselves. If art was a school and genres and mediums were the students, divergent literature would be the kids that come from all walks of life, all classes of society, all races and religions, that have little to nothing in common but the one burning thing that finds them all in detention together on a Saturday morning.

Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language.’ What is it?
If I told you that it wouldn’t be a secret anymore. If you have to ask, you wouldn’t understand.

Tell us about your literary influences.
Bukowski, Sexton, Plath, Leonard Cohen, Gordon Downie

Has any of your work been published in print?  How did that happen?
My second book of poetry, I am a World of Uncertainties Disguised as a Girl was published by Jasper and Sudden Denouement Publishing.

What are your writing goals?
To not stop

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?
Drawing a blank

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?
It’s in the acknowledgments of my book 😉

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Nicholas Gagnier

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?
Most of the time, my own. Past blogs have taken on a moniker that is not my own, but every book I have published bears my name and not the project it’s associated with.

In what part of the world do you live?
I live in Canada, in the national capital, Ottawa. My parents met working the Prime Minister’s office in the late 70s. It’s pretty quiet here, unlike our neighbours Toronto and Montreal. Very much a political town, full of old buildings and the Parliament can be seen from every direction when downtown.

Tell us about yourself.
I am a writer. I feel like I can say because there are almost physical withdrawals to going a day without writing or creating something. I started writing poetry when I was eleven. To be honest, it was never part of my plan to be a poet, but my father was gone a lot and I was left with his monster of a third wife who emotionally manipulated every second of my day. Writing became my form of control in a hostile environment, and poetry was so easy, it just evolved from there.

Where do you publish your work?
FVR Publishing

When did you begin your blog and what motivated you start it?
When I was 22, my friend took her life and ever since, not only have my own mental health issues become more prominent, but I promised to honour her somehow. After completing my first novel in 2011, I started thinking about blogging. All the poetry on my hard drive, some stretching back years, wasn’t exactly my first attempt at a blog, but the reactions were swift and positive, and it’s something I spent the last six years honing. I feel truly blessed for having had the experience, which has opened so many amazing doors and introduced me to some wonderful people.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging?
Honestly, I just love writing. I have struggled with some facets of it over the years, but even at my most financially or mentally precarious, I feel so blessed to have the compulsion to create. Not everything comes out the way you’d hope, but that only makes your best work stand out more.

When and how did you find your way to Sudden Denouement?
Very recently, in fact. I’m the new kid here. For me, joining SD is the outcome of cultivating relationships with some amazing people. I believe the earliest exchange between one of its writers and I was with Kindra on my blog. Others followed my blog, and I followed them back. I found Nicole on Facebook while looking through poetry pages, and her work spoke (and still does!) volumes to me. I remember meeting Christine through my mental health book, Swear to Me, although I’m sure we had exchanges before that. It took awhile to connect everyone to Sudden Denouement, but I could not turn down the chance to work with so many of my favourite modern poets.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
Well, to diverge is to separate, and I take that to mean we stand apart from the mainstream, carving out our own niche in the literary world. I have nothing but respect for for those who do the things they’ve always been done, but I was never good with conventional means, so I’m happy with that definition.

Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language.’ What is it?
I don’t yet know Jasper well enough to deduce much from this statement, honestly.

Tell us about your literary influences.
Stephen King was my first huge literary influence- my mom gave me a copy of Cujo when I was 9. Once the nightmares subsided, I went on to read most of his work up until the mid-2000s. Chuck Palahnuik is another huge one. I used to read a lot more before my kid was born. I should correct that. I used to read more than Dr. Seuss before my kid. I’m happy because she’s now learning how to read, and hopefully I can show her there’s a lot more than picture books. My dad once gave me a copy of the Two Towers without having read Fellowship of the Ring, so needless to say, I hope to do a better job teaching her than he did with me.

Has any of your work been published in print?  How did that happen?
I have published three full collections of poetry- GROUND ZERO, SWEAR TO ME and the FVR Collection. There have been five smaller chapbooks, ten to twelve poems each, that focused on subjects ranging from economic disparity to Donald Trump. Those are some of my favourites.

I have completed two full novels in my lifetime. The first one was a mess and the second is in eternal limbo. I will publish my third, which is about half finished, sometime next year, using all the experience I’ve gathered publishing poetry.

What are your writing goals?
I used to write because I thought I was a great writer, but I have been humbled the last five years. Part of that was my own mental health deteriorating, another was seeing the sheer breadth of talent I had to compete with. At my lowest moment, I had this epiphany, that all my secrets had to come out, including my struggles with my sexuality and depression. I had to stop pretending to be what I wanted to be and be what I am, or it would kill me. To make this a bit more succinct, the goals are momentary now. I don’t need to be the world’s best writer, just one I like myself.

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?
There’s no easy to answer to this, as I am my own worst critic. Everything in the FVR Collection comprises the poems I keep closest, the ones I would want my daughter and family to see after I’m gone. At the risk of diverging from the pack, I will leave this quote instead, from my poem “AlterKnitUniVerse”:

Skies under
the influence of
a cooler shade of day;
a pair of new
moons serve to
ascertain this
 
isn’t a world created
for me but
the one I endlessly
handcrafted,
destroyed
and adapted,
 
and I let
its rapids
carry me
 
throughout.

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?
You are more than the sum of your struggles. That is the message my poetry has sought to leave. That is the message it will continue to cultivate, while I work alongside some of the world’s best writers to help SD thrive.

 

Thank you.

 

Meet Sudden Denouement Collective Member Samantha Lucero

The editors of Sudden Denouement Literary Collective know that our strength is our writers. We hope that you enjoy getting to know them through our new Writer Interview Series.

What name do you write under?
My poetry and short stories are under Samantha Lucero.

In what part of the world do you live?
Super cowboy USA Hot Dog Rocket Ship Number One.

Tell us about yourself. 
According to BuzzFeeds, “What Batman villain are you?” quiz I’m the Joker. Some people just wanna watch the world burn.

 Where do you publish your work?
six red seeds

When did you begin your blog and what motivated you start it?
Few years ago after hoarding short stories, half-finished novels, poems, screenplays, graphic novels, dead bodies, teeth, cat skulls, I decided to create a centralized location to dump it all. Believing that it would function more as a private sanctum and a way to encourage beginning writing again (who would read it, anyway?) I began occasionally posting on my blog and received a favorable reaction. My time has become scarcer since it served its function and continues to, but I mostly chiefly work on novels now, and post a piece of poetry here and there. I guess that means I should make a ‘website’ instead.

What inspires/motivates you to keep blogging?
I don’t update often. I am not a blogger. I spend my writing time not with updating or maintaining my blog, but rather in a word document editing or writing. I’m a storyteller that’s got poetry as my side chick. When I write a poem or a piece of prose, I usually just post it onto my blog, because what’s the use of piling them up in some reliquary in a GDocs folder like a literary graveyard? That’s what my novels and stories are for. 😉

How did you find your way to Sudden Denouement?
Jasper found the poems of mine that were rejected by the Paris Review and he implored me to join the collective with his soothsay and Texas tea.

What does “Divergent Literature” mean to you?
Don’t do what the person in front of you is doing.

Jasper Kerkau frequently talks about Sudden Denouement writers using the ‘secret language.’ What is it?
The secret language was actually a conversation between Jasper and I in emails. It is that moment when reading a piece that you realize that the person (even if cryptically) is speaking to your own inner world, in your own language, in their own words. It is true literary poetry, not commercial poetry, at it’s finest, so much so, that it is similar to witnessing somebody reach the perfect note while singing or listening to a moving climax in a symphony. It’s when you know they know. And not everyone does. It leads into the term part of the tribe.

Tell us about your literary influences.
Gothic, Southern gothic, horror, dystopia. . .

Has any of your work been published in print?  How did that happen?
I’ve had a southern gothic and a horror short story, and one piece in a poetry book dedicated entirely to Salem published. I’ve also self-published a poetry book (that’s getting a cover makeover). I may have more published soon. I also have a novel in the editing process, which will be sent out to agents afterward, and yet another novel being written currently. How’d it happen? Well, I sat down and wrote some shit and then I sent that shit in, and some people wanted it in their shit.

What are your writing goals? 
“There is only one thing you should do. Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write. This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write?” – Rilke

Which pieces of your own writing are your favorites?
La Tristesse Durera Toujour
2.

What else would like to share about your writing, Sudden Denouement, or yourself?
I live in my head, if you wanna know something, molon labe.

Regarding SD, what a place I’ve encountered so many wonderful people and writers.